Thursday, May 17, 2018

Micro-Actions, Big Results.


*MLA’s note* I’m so happy to introduce Laska Paré! Laska is one of our amazing constituents in Saanich South, and over the coming months she’ll be writing a series of guest blog posts to provide tips on small changes we can make in our day-to-day lives to encourage us to live more sustainably. Read on below to find out more! -Lana 

Climate change: it’s in the news almost daily as the most pressing issue of our time. Yet for such an important issue it can feel out of grasp for most individuals. How can we engage or influence something we cannot see or feel? And while some regions of the world bear the brunt of climate change (think: submerged Solomon Islands in the Pacific), if we don’t see much change in our local climate, how much will it really impact our lives?

Climate is not seen outside the window – it’s not the weather. It’s a collection of data and patterns presented in a statistical construct. This can make it challenging to talk about a changing climate system; we have to realize that we’re not dealing with something tangible.
So how can ‘we’, regular people living our lives, take action and do something about this obscure ‘thing’?

Every day we make millions of micro-actions, the small, easy (sometimes unconscious) decisions that over time amount to real world impacts. What if we consciously decided to adopt micro-actions that would support sustainable practices? Imagine if you walked or biked instead of bussed or drove to work? What if you stopped purchasing products that came with additional packaging?
These micro-actions are small, but over time they become the data and patterns that build up the ‘statistical construct’ that is our global climate.

Decades from now, when your children or grandchildren ask, ‘Did you know about climate change?’ consider you want your answer to be: “Yes, and here are the micro-actions I took to help.”

Micro-actions for May

The first step in becoming more aware of your waste is to investigate yourself. One of the easiest ways to do this is by actually looking at your garbage and recycling. The next time you’re rolling the bin to the curb or carrying that blue box to the roadside for pick up pause, look at your waste, then ask yourself, “Can I eliminate one thing to lighten this load?”

A common household item often placed in the garbage are toilet paper and paper towel rolls. Empty toilet paper rolls often never make it into recycling bins because they get mixed with garbage. Make it easier to recycle these tubes by placing a small recycling bin in your bathroom; or why not ditch the bathroom trash can all together? Most bathroom bins are filled with items that can be composted, like hair, nail clippings and tissues. Having a bin supports the idea of bathroom trash. Try supporting a new narrative: no bin, no waste. Experiment for a week and see what happens. You might realize how unnecessary it is…

***Note: In the CRD, paper towel and toilet paper rolls go into the blue bag (along with other paper products)

- Laska